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How Should Your Skin Care Routine Look Like if You’re 30?

It can seem overwhelming to navigate skincare at any age. But once you reach your 30s, it can become overwhelming. Are you tempted to give in to the lure of a product backed by celebrities promising to reduce fine lines? What about ingredients such as retinol and hyaluronic acids? What are their benefits? Can someone please tell us, once and for all, how often should we exfoliate?

It doesn’t have to be complicated or intimidating. It doesn’t matter how many “rules” or “guidelines” are being thrown at you (especially as we age), it really comes down to what is best for your skin. (We know, shocking.)

Joshua Ross, a celebrity esthetician and founder of SKINLAB Los Angeles, was our guide through the maze of skincare jargon. We asked Joshua Ross to help us figure out what our skin care routine should look like in our late 30s. It’s actually quite simple. Continue reading for the complete rundown.

WHAT CAN A SKINCARE ROUTINE BE FOR A 30 YEAR-OLD?

HOW DOES IT DIFFER FROM THE ROUTINE ANOTHER 30 YEAR-OLD HAD PRIORLY?

Your skin is different from what it was in your teens or 20s. While you may still experience the same issues as when you were younger, such as pigmentation, fine lines and wrinkles and acne, the way you treat them now is very different.

He says that the skin problems many women experience in their 30s, particularly when it comes to acne and other skin issues, are more stress-related, hormonal, and inflammatory. You must stop going to CVS for a benzoyl-peroxide and salicylic acid wash, and acne this, acne because these will be too harsh for your skin. You should instead focus on gentle detoxification of the skin. Use creamy cleansers and soothing mists rather than antiseptic toners. This will make treatment easier and more effective.

IS IT ALREADY TOO LATE?

It is never too late for you to take better care of your skin. It’s important that you have realistic expectations of what your at-home products can do if you’re a beginner. Ross says that it all depends on how your skin is doing when you begin implementing new products. If you don’t already see signs of aging, you can maintain the quality and functionality of your skin by starting a regimen. If you have already noticed damage to your skin, the regimen won’t make much difference. This is when you may need to consult a professional. Their job is to evaluate different products. Just because something works for someone else doesn’t mean that it will work for them. You can rely on the pros to help you.

SHOULD OUR SKINCARE RULES CHANGE DURING THE TRANSITION

FROM OUR EARLY 30S DIRECTLY TO OUR OLDER 30S?

Yes…and no. Ross says that it is important to address the skin’s needs at the time and not set a routine for a specific year. Ross says that no one has a single skin type. If you have sensitive skin, you should use gentler products that are more hydrating. Your skin can be affected by many things, especially in your 30s.

SHOULD MORNING ROUTINE DIFFER FROM NIGHT ROUTINE?

The short answer is: Yes. Ross says that you should use products high in antioxidants and protection for your morning routine. Learn more about Vitamin C serums, sunscreen, and other sun protection products. You want to spend the evening focusing on your heroes ingredients that target specific concerns such as anti-aging and pigmentation.

WHAT IS THE ROUTINE THEN?

For beginners:

It’s a bad idea to suddenly apply different products to your skin if you are new to skincare. Retinoids can be irritating to skin that hasn’t been used before. Ross says that before you can focus on treating active acne and repairing signs of aging, it is important to improve the overall health of your skin. This includes gentle cleansers and moisturizers as well as sunscreen.

Intermediate:

You’ve been diligently maintaining your skin’s health, so now it is time to introduce products that will improve its appearance. To balance the skin’s pH, you should look for gentle toners. Also, be sure to check out treatments that contain peptides or antioxidants to improve the texture and firmness. Ross says that peptides are an amino acid, which protect the skin and stimulate collagen, which results in younger-looking skin. Vitamins A, C, and E are antioxidants that help increase cell turnover and protect the skin against sun and free radicals. They also protect the skin barrier from further damage.

For the more advanced:

Once you have a good understanding of your routine, it is time to focus on specific areas and rejuvenate your complexion. You can add an eye cream, or an eye serum (Ross prefers this because it is more likely to cause milia), and a retinol. Feel free to experiment with different tools. Start with a lower dosage of retinol if you are new to the product. You can increase your skin’s tolerance while avoiding irritation.

Ross’s final recommendation is to exfoliate with great care. Ross says that daily exfoliating can cause skin irritations and increase the risk of developing acne. “I don’t recommend using harsh at-home chemical exfoliators for daily use. Look for powder exfoliators, which will gently scrub the skin, or products that contain enzymes that break down and slough off dead skin. These are suitable for daily use.” Noted.

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